Ubuntu?

Discussion in 'Linux' started by NaotoKhan, Nov 14, 2007.

  1. NaotoKhan Private

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    So now that I have a new laptop (which kicks some serious butt I might add), I'd like to wipe out my old laptop and put Linux on it for experimentation and a backup machine. Ubuntu seems like the most obvious choice, but I'm not very familiar with Linux distributions so thought I'd ask. I know some others have come out recently . . . of course I'm looking for something free.

    Also, what's the best way to go about installing it? Is it necessary to have a boot disk?
  2. Kachu Captain

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    No boot disk is nessary but it will save you a whole lot of time and effor if you burn that 10 cent disk.

    http://wubi-installer.org/
    My brother did it for his laptop without a dvd drive or usb booting. Its a pain in the butt

    Grub is also a solution
    http://www.instantfundas.com/2007/08/install-any-linux-distro-directly-from.html

    As for distros stick with ubuntu. Its a full fledged OS and since your migrating from windows that will make you feel more comfortable. If you want try PuppyLinux or Damn small Linux both are good for usb drive linux. gOS is ok for your [grand]parents or children. It has a nice and clean desktop and is very easy to read and use.
    1 people like this.
  3. @(...:.:...)@ Hal

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    I would go with OpenSUSE 10.3 w/ KDE desktop.

    Don't be afraid of downloading some live CDs (or even installing then wiping) to try out some different distros and see what you like best. Might be best to install them, because live CDs are slow, and you can't try out installing software etc.

    Look at distro watch and pick out a few that you like the look of, and download their live CDs, or install them if they don't have one: http://distrowatch.com/dwres.php?resource=major

    If you don't have a DVD drive then you can network boot with PXE (which pretty much all mobos support) without much difficulty. (well, much more difficulty than a cd, but relatively speaking): http://en.opensuse.org/SuSE_install_with_PXE_boot You should probably only try this if you have previous linux experience.
  4. NaotoKhan Private

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    Great site, thanks. Time to start experimenting :cool:

    EDIT: I've been wanting to format my hard drive for a while anyway - would it work to wipe it clean and then install Ubuntu from a CD? [linux noob] I downloaded the .iso install file, not sure how to use it though [/linux noob]
  5. Kachu Captain

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    Burn the iso file to a cd by using a cd burning program (nero, alchol, infarecorder(I cant spell)) Link is to an open source windows iso burning app.

    Make sure you boot from the cd drive that its in.
    You will boot to a Live CD where nothing on your computer is installed. (Take 5 mins to check it out instead of installing it (takes about 5 mins to install + waiting on it to reboot for you))
    On the desktop [typicaly] is an icon that says install. Click it
    Follow the instructions on the screen, Since you havnt really said you want to keep windows Ide sudgust letting it do the partitioning.
    At the end of the install it will autoshutdown and then ask you to remove the cd.
    Enjoy

    As far as how hard the menus are to follow, if you can install windows you will think this is a Cake walk and your the only one playing.

    For more help (Most other installs are very similar)
    https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Installation
  6. @(...:.:...)@ Hal

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    +1 for Infrarecorder, great app.
  7. .:|DaN|:. Hell ain't a bad place...

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    Ubuntu is certainly a good choice, i'm running it on a secondary partition on my laptop. I'm using WINE with it; it makes me able to run most Windows applications and even games (I've been able to play MoH:AA on it and even GTA)

    You can download themes which can make it look more like Windows if you want, or even the Os X...

    Because it can only read NTFS and not write, i use a special piece of software to allow reading-writingNTFS to my other Windows partition :)
  8. NaotoKhan Private

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    I'm having a terrible time trying to get the wireless network connected with Ubuntu. Apparently my Dell 1350 wireless card is based on a Broadcom firmware that is notorious for having problems with Linux - it's supposed to work with NDISWrapper though . . .

    I have no clue what I just said in that paragraph, but I do know Ubuntu is almost useless without internet connectivity. I also know that help.ubuntu.com has been nearly useless to me as well, I have read all kinds of stuff there and learned pretty much nothing. I think it must be mainly the 7.10 documentation though, the documentation for some of the other versions and the community stuff seems a litlte better. The 7.10 stuff is just grossly simplistic and never really explains anything. It's more like a magic spellbook to get specific things done, rather than actually explaining how it works. The various Linux/Ubuntu forums are much more useful, but it takes ages to dig through stuff on those forums.

    At any rate the snag I am hitting is I cannot figure out how to get NDISWrapper installed - tried doing it through the Synaptic Package Manager, and it seemed to install fine but there is nothing new to run. It says here that I need to install ndisgtk in order to get the wireless driver options available, but there is no ndisgtk in SPM for me to install.

    Any ideas?
  9. Kachu Captain

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    NDIS wrapper is a tool for using the windows driver in linux. Ill try to find some info for you but I dont have the time right now. You will need to use the terminal to edit some configurations and might need to connect to a wired connection to get the right version of NDISwrapper. You will need your old windows drivers and some basic commands (moving/locating files & folders)
  10. NaotoKhan Private

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    That's the thing though - the NDISWrapper package seemed to install fine, it just doesn't actually DO anything.

    I found some terminal commands the other day to show the network settings, and it said that the wireless card was disabled (I guess because it didn't have a driver). I can download stuff on my other laptop and transfer it in a matter of seconds with my thumbdrive - that's what I've been doing so far anyway. I just can't figure out how to get a driver installed.
  11. Flipsen Gunnery Sergeant

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    Why?
  12. Kachu Captain

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    Dont worry about getting ndisgtk its just a graphical front end.
    Follow this link basically (go to the dell link)
    Gedit is the standard ubuntu text editor

    Proably your best link on how to getting it working (for ubuntu 7.4)
    Thanks to Dell

    I gotta admit its nice to see that dell cares enough about its coustomers to put up a wiki like that. But Im still proably going to buy an EEE for christmas

    Here is how to do it for kubuntu
  13. @(...:.:...)@ Hal

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    Because I think it's better than Ubuntu, and I don't like the idea of a Linux Monopoly.
  14. NaotoKhan Private

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    Thanks Kachu, that Dell link did the trick. I'm online now, big step in the right direction! I also managed to get my problem fixed with installing applications, I guess for some reason no sources were selected for downloading updates/applications . . . no idea why.

    At any rate my only remaining question now is what's with the administrator rights? What they say here makes sense, but even though I have given every power I can find to myself and added myself to all the user groups (including root), it still won't let me do anything in the root folder or certain other root user tasks. I also can't log in as the "root" - it says the administrator can't login from that screen. I thought the user I created in the installation ("ben") was the administrator? That would only make sense . . .

    So I have two users, "root" and "ben" and I can't seem to log into "root" and "ben" doesn't give me root privileges. It's probably some simple Linux thing that's totally going over my head :confused:
  15. @(...:.:...)@ Hal

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    To run a single command as root, type sudo then the command. To become root in a terminal type su, to run a gui app as root type [SIZE=-1]gtksudo then the ap name.

    Also I would reset the privaliges back to default, your should never be running as root all the time with a normal account.
    [/SIZE]
  16. NaotoKhan Private

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    Why not? No one ever uses the computer except me.

    Thanks for the commands though, that should help. How then would I copy a folder/file into one of the top level folders that has to have root permissions?
  17. @(...:.:...)@ Hal

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    Because anything you run would have system wide privileges. If there is a vulnerability in a user mode piece of software like a web browser, instead of perhaps messing with your accounts files, your whole box could get screwed. Nothing you do as a Linux user requires root privileges other than administration stuff like installing software.

    It's like having a safe in your house to keep stuff in, but leaving it open because the front door is locked.

    Unlike Windows, you rarely need to elevate to a root user, and when you do it is simple to do so with sudo or gtksu/kdesu.

    Although it may be that in Ubuntu your account is a member of the root group (or whatever it is called) by default, because the first users password is used (initially anyway) as the root password.

    Having said that, it is not like the sky is going to fall on your head if you run as root the whole time, it is just not a good practice to get into. Running as a limited user also prevents you from breaking the system by mistake.

    ===============================

    To copy a file/folder into a folder your account does not have write permissions for, you would do this:

    sudo cp myfolder /etc/somewhere

    asuming you were in the parent folder of myfolder. eg if myfolder was on the Desktop, you would first do

    cd ~/Desktop
    sudo cp myfolder /blahblah/somePlace

    ~ = your home folder, same as writing /home/hal for example.
  18. NaotoKhan Private

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    Awesome, thanks Hal.

    What software would that be? I have XP on another patition now and it is NTFS, I think I'm to the point where that software would be really handy . . .
  19. @(...:.:...)@ Hal

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  20. Flipsen Gunnery Sergeant

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    Fair enough, though I don't agree with the latter.

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